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From cradle to grave: Factors that shaped evolution

This study brings us closer to knowing the complex interactions between topography and climate change, and how these factors influence the evolutionary histories and biodiversity of species in natural ecosystems. »
19 July 2018, 22:40 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

Expected sea-level rise following Antarctic ice shelves' collapse

Scientists have shown how much sea level would rise if Larsen C and George VI, Antarctic ice shelves at risk of collapse, were to break up. While Larsen C has received much attention due to the break-away of a trillion-ton iceberg from it last summer, its collapse would contribute only a few millimeters to sea-level rise. »
19 July 2018, 16:31 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

Cities as study proxies for climate change

Cities can serve as useful proxies to study and predict the effects of climate change, according to a research review that tracks urbanization's effects on plant and insect species. »
19 July 2018, 04:10 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

Scientists lack vital knowledge on rapid Arctic climate change

Arctic climate change research relies on field measurements and samples that are too scarce, and patchy at best, according to a comprehensive review study. The researchers looked at thousands of scientific studies, and found that around 30% of cited studies were clustered around only two research stations in the vast Arctic region. »
18 July 2018, 22:00 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

Thawing permafrost microbiomes fuel climate change

A new study could lead to more accurate predictions or the rate of global warming from greenhouse gas emissions produced by thawing permafrost in the next 100 years. The study of the microorganisms involved in permafrost carbon degradation links changing microbial communities and biogeochemistry to the rise of greenhouse gas emissions. »
17 July 2018, 02:50 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

Protecting tropical forest carbon stocks may not prevent large-scale species loss

As the world seeks to curb human-induced climate change, will protecting the carbon of tropical forests also ensure the survival of their species? A study suggests the answer to this question is far from straightforward. Forests with the greatest carbon content do not necessarily house the most species, meaning carbon-focused conservation can miss large swathes of tropical forest biodiversity. »
17 July 2018, 02:50 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

Flipping the switch: Making use of carbon price dollars for health and education

A switch from subsidizing fossil fuel to pricing CO2-emissions would not only help to meet global climate targets but also create additional domestic public revenues. These revenues could finance expenses towards sustainable development, improving health-care, education and infrastructure for energy, transportation or clean water. »
16 July 2018, 20:40 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

Getting to know the microbes that drive climate change

A new understanding of the microbes and viruses in the thawing permafrost in Sweden may help scientists better predict the pace of climate change. »
16 July 2018, 20:40 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

Reducing carbon emissions will limit sea level rise

A new study demonstrates that a correlation also exists between cumulative carbon emissions and future sea level rise over time -- and the news isn't good. »
16 July 2018, 20:40 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

Capacity of North American forests to sequester carbon

Researchers have calculated the capacity of North American forests to sequester carbon in a detailed analysis that for the first time integrates natural processes and climate changes that are likely to alter growth over the next 60 years. »
14 July 2018, 00:50 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

Geological records reveal sea-level rise threatens UK salt marshes, study says

Sea-level rise will endanger valuable salt marshes across the United Kingdom by 2100 if greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated, according to an international study. Moreover, salt marshes in southern and eastern England face a high risk of loss by 2040, according to the study. »
13 July 2018, 00:10 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

Mapping species range shifts under recent climatic changes

The inclusion of taxon-specific sensitivity to a shifting climate helps us understand species distributional responses to changes in climate. »
12 July 2018, 18:00 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

California's cap-and-trade air quality benefits mostly go out of state

California has one of the world's most progressive cap-and-trade designed to reduce greenhouse gases. Yet in disadvantaged communities, emissions of those pollutants has actually gone up. »
11 July 2018, 23:30 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

Salamanders show more resistance to global warming than previously believed

The southern Appalachian Mountains are home to 10 percent of global salamander diversity. But current predictions indicate that 70 to 85 percent of this habitat will become unsuitable for salamanders by 2080 due to rising temperatures caused by climate change. »
11 July 2018, 23:30 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

Grasslands more reliable carbon sink than trees

A study has found that increased drought and wildfire risk make grasslands and rangelands a more reliable carbon sink than trees in 21st century California. As such, the study indicates they should be given opportunities in the state's cap-and-and trade market, which is designed to reduce California's greenhouse gas emissions to 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030. »
10 July 2018, 22:50 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

Pulse of the polar vortex revealed: A key to mapping future storms

If you can predict the path of the jet stream, the upper atmosphere's undulating river of wind, then you can predict weather -- not just for a week or two, but for an entire season. »
10 July 2018, 22:50 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

Strengthening west winds close to Antarctica previously led to massive outgassing of carbon

A new explanation for the Heinrich 1 event, where temperatures over Antarctica rose 5C in less than a century, suggests strengthening westerlies around the Antarctic led to a substantial increase in atmospheric carbon. »
10 July 2018, 16:41 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

Scientists capture breaking of glacier in Greenland

A team of scientists has captured on video a four-mile iceberg breaking away from a glacier in eastern Greenland, an event that points to one of the forces behind global sea-level rise. »
9 July 2018, 22:10 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

What natural greenhouse gases from wetlands and permafrosts mean for Paris Agreement goals

Global fossil fuel emissions would have to be reduced by as much as 20 percent more than previous estimates to achieve the Paris Agreement targets, because of natural greenhouse gas emissions from wetlands and permafrost, new research has found. The additional reductions are equivalent to five to six years of carbon emissions from human activities. »
9 July 2018, 22:10 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

Global warming may be twice what climate models predict

Future global warming may eventually be twice as warm as projected by climate models under business-as-usual scenarios and even if the world meets the 2°C target sea levels may rise six meters or more, according to an international team of researchers from 17 countries. »
6 July 2018, 07:50 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email